Journal of the Endocrine Society
Oxford University Press
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MON-256 A Late-Onset Case of Sheehan’s Syndrome Presenting as Life Threatening Adrenal Insufficiency
DOI 10.1210/jendso/bvaa046.1392, Volume: 4, Issue: Suppl 1,

Highlights

Notes

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Sheehan’s syndrome or postpartum pituitary necrosis, is an important but rare cause of hypopituitarism, caused due to severe postpartum hemorrhage. Seen more commonly in the developing world, it is less common in developed countries due to advanced obstetric practices. It can present acutely but more frequently has an insidious course (onset 10-20 years later) with variable hormonal deficiencies. Here, we report a late-onset case of Sheehan’s syndrome, 24 years after the incident event, presenting as life threatening adrenal failure.

CASE PRESENTATION

A 48-year-old female with no significant past medical history was admitted to the hospital after being found unresponsive at home. She had not seen a physician for many years. She complained of weakness and lethargy for a week and recently established care with a primary care physician. The patient was severely hypotensive in the emergency department and had an elevated temperature of 101°F. Physical examination showed no significant abnormalities. CBC and metabolic panel were not significantly altered. CSF analysis and CSF/blood cultures were negative for any infection. TSH was 4.29 mIU/mL (0.27-4.20) but the total and free T4 (fT4) were severely low at 1.1 mcg/mL (4.6-12) and 0.24 ng/dL (0.93-1.70) respectively. On further questioning, patient reported severe postpartum hemorrhage 24 years ago, needing multiple units of blood transfusion. This was followed by inability to lactate and menstruate but was never worked up as she had not seen any physician all these years. Pituitary hormonal panel was obtained, demonstrating multiple hormonal deficiencies with fT4 severely low at 0.24 ng/dL, ACTH of 2.6 pg/mL (7.2-63.3), prolactin (PRL) 1 ng/mL (4.8-23.3) and insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) low at 10 ng/mL (56-194). Cortisol level was elevated in the hospital due to administration of high dose IV steroids but a morning cortisol level obtained 1 week prior by her primary was 1.5 mcg/dL (10-20). Estradiol levels were low with FSH and LH levels inappropriately normal. MRI of the pituitary was obtained which showed an empty sella turcica. Patient was diagnosed as late-onset Sheehan’s syndrome. She was started on hormone replacement with hydrocortisone followed by levothyroxine and had marked improvement in her symptoms. She continues to do well.

CONCLUSION

Our patient presented late due to lack of medical care and awareness. A great number of patients with Sheehan’s diseasae go undiagnosed due to subtle clinical presentations, thus delaying treatment. It is imperative to diagnose this condition timely with appropriate obstetric/gynecological history and clinical suspicion to avoid late manifestations of the disease, especially adrenal crisis. Patients at risk need long term follow-up. Early treatment is necessary to improve quality of life and reduce morbidity and mortality associated with this condition.

Bhat, Goyal, and Batra: MON-256 A Late-Onset Case of Sheehan’s Syndrome Presenting as Life Threatening Adrenal Insufficiency
https://www.researchpad.co/tools/openurl?pubtype=article&doi=10.1210/jendso/bvaa046.1392&title=MON-256 A Late-Onset Case of Sheehan’s Syndrome Presenting as Life Threatening Adrenal Insufficiency&author=Salman Zahoor Bhat,Itivrita Goyal,Manav Batra,&keyword=&subject=Neuroendocrinology and Pituitary,Case Reports in Unusual Pathologies in the Pituitary II,AcademicSubjects/MED00250,